Top Five GRE Tips

GRE Prep

  1. Start studying for your GRE early. How early? You can improve on your GRE math (quantitative) scores quickly since most of it is basic, and most people just need a refresher. Building an adequate GRE vocabulary, however, takes a long time. Several months is best.
  2. Be strategic with what you study for the GRE. For example, it’s not worthwhile for most people to practice the GRE reading comprehension much. You just won’t improve your score that much for the amount of time it will cost you. Better; knowing the techniques and ways to identify the best answers on the GRE quantitative and GRE verbal sections will give big score increases in a hurry.
  3. Know how your grad school handles your GRE scores. Call up your grad school adviser and find out which sections of the GRE they are most concerned with. Do they even look at your GRE written analytical scores? Many schools don’t. Do they use your scores as a way to weed out which students they will consider? Is your score something they collect but don’t actually use in the admissions process? Is it a way to differentiate applicants who are otherwise similarly qualified? Find out more here.
  4. Get good GRE help. A good GRE prep course can really make a big difference in your scores in a hurry. You can find out exactly what’s on the test as well as getting guided practice. The best courses have experienced instructors and high quality practice questions. You can check out my GRE prep course options here. OR see my online video course.
  5. Know the Single Best Way to Boost Your GRE Score!
© Cody Blair, All Rights Reserved.

Does Race Affect Academic Performance?

It does. And so does gender. Exactly how it effects your test scores totally depends on the thoughts floating around in your head, no matter what color it is. In fact, race and gender aren’t really the culprit; for that we have to look to stereotypes.

In the classic study on stereotype threat researchers Claude Steele and Joshua Aronson looked at the performance of African American and White college students. The African American students’ performance on the GRE test varied markedly when they were primed to think of the test in two different ways. When the GRE was presented as a measure of intelligence African American students performedContinue reading “Does Race Affect Academic Performance?”

© Cody Blair, All Rights Reserved.

McCafferty on Cramming

Memorize and purge - cramming is stupid
“All subjects are the same. I memorize notes for a test, spew it, ace it, then forget it. What makes this scary for the future of our country is that I’m in the tip-top percentile on every standardized test. I’m a model student with a very crappy attitude about learning.”
Cramming is just dumb. There are much more effective (and easy) ways to study!
© Cody Blair, All Rights Reserved.

The Secret to Kicking Procrastination: Reward Yourself

This short video, by Dan Ariely–one of my favorite psychologists–gives you some quick and easy tricks for defeating procrastination. You can find loads more good info on defeating procrastination here. Dan Ariely, an Israeli American professor of psychology and behavioral economics, currently teaches at Duke University. He is also the founder of The Center for Advanced Hindsight and also the co-founder of BEworks.

© Cody Blair, All Rights Reserved.

4 Simple Steps to Beat Procrastination

Motivation done right lets you motor through your to-do list like magic. Try this simple trick from London-based writer, Sidin Vadukut. Pair each chore on your daily to-do list with a short, sweet reward.

You are using a to-do list and a calendar to make short work of your academic tasks, aren’t you? Paper works great, but I’ve recently been playing with Wunderlist 2 and have been pleasantly surprised.

Here’s how it works…

  1. On your to do list add a fun to-do after each and every task.
  2. Assign your tasks (the fun ones and the less fun ones) a time to complete. That will keep you from letting things drag out or from over-scheduling yourself.
  3. Keep your fun to work ratio at about 1:10. For example, if I spend forty-five minutes studying my Econ homework, I might then allow myself five minutes of Smarter Every Day.
  4. Bask in the glory of a fully checked off to-do list.

Let us know your favorite rewards in the comments!

Read Sidin’s full article on fighting procrastination here.

© Cody Blair, All Rights Reserved.

5 Motivational Kickers while Studying Online

Guest post by Allie Dillard

Online studying has its own challenges and motivation is one of them.  Students may get distracted being in a different setting, so they need to put in some extra effort to maintain their focus and attention. Listed below are some tips on how learners can remain centered and motivated.Continue reading “5 Motivational Kickers while Studying Online”

7 Ways Students Waste Time and Energy (that are ridiculously easy to avoid)

Author of The Toyota Way, Jeffrey K. Liker, says that there are seven main types of waste Toyota has identified in its business. They’re boring, so I won’t share them here. Go get the book.

Besides being a palindrome ‘a toyota’ is also a good bet for a reliable vehicle that will get you where you want to go. Your education should get you where you want to go as well, so with that labored and overwrought segue, I present—bump, pa, bummm!—the seven ways students flush away their time and energy (that don’t involve social media or games).Continue reading “7 Ways Students Waste Time and Energy (that are ridiculously easy to avoid)”

© Cody Blair, All Rights Reserved.